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154 State Street, Presque Isle, ME 04769
PO Box 33, Presque, ME 04769
 
 
 
 
 
 

Social Security Disability

 
Strictly speaking you do not need a will, and there is no law that requires you to have one. But if you want to be sure that your property goes where you want it to go after your death, it is a good idea to have a written will.
The United States Congress enacted the Social Security Act in 1935 after the Great Depression in 1929 left so many Americans without sufficient income to provide for their retirement, and the program has expanded over the years to provide benefits to survivors, dependents and many disabled persons who can prove eligibility. There are earnings requirements to receive disability insurance benefits (SSD), low income requirements to get Supplement Security Income benefits (SSI). If Social Security denies your application for any benefits we will assist you, and only charge for our services if you win your case.

DO YOU NEED A WILL?

 
 
So long as you have reached the age of 18 years, and are of sound mind, you have the right to make a will, if you want one. If you don't make a will, Maine's Intestate Succession Law will decide who gets the property in your estate after you die. If you prefer you can have certain of your property at your death go right away to another person, such as a joint bank account, or a named beneficiary of a life insurance policy, without it going to them by will in the Probate process. You can draft your own will in your own writing (called a holographic will), and you don't have to hire a lawyer if you don't want to or cannot afford to do so, so long as your will is a proper form as required by law. Maine has a Statutory Will form, which can be purchased at the Probate Court for a nominal ₱50 charge, with simple instructions printed right on it, where you can fill in the blanks to indicate such things as where you want your property to go, who you want as guardian of any minor children you leave behind or who you want to manage any property that you leave to them, and the personal representative that you want to see to it that your will is carried out. The Maine Statutory Will even gives instructions to your witnesses - two are required in Maine – as to the formalities they must observe when signing as witnesses. You can change your will at any time before you die, so long as you are of sound mind at the time and not mentally incapacitated, by doing a codicil of an existing will, or by revoking your old will and making a new one. Always remember that you should read your will over periodically to be sure that it is still what you want. It is common sense to do so because circumstances, such as the death of a spouse or child may intervene; and even laws change as time goes by
Contact us by calling (888) 277-0140, for assistance in filing Social Security disability.